riverside market garden

Festive Sprout Stir Fry

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Sprouts[a]

This is a recipe that even the biggest sprout sceptic will enjoy – I have tested this with my partner whose face contorts with disgust every time I even mention sprouts. Slicing the sprouts finely definitely helps. For the host of a Christmas dinner this is a great side for any roast and rather helpfully the recipe can be cooked mostly on the hob, freeing up the necessary space in your oven.

As all recipes this month are inspired by Riverside Market Garden’s vegetable box all you need to do is place your order today (Wednesday 16 December) and you will have all the vegetable ingredients you need to execute this and the rest of the recipes.

The combination of ginger (in the stir fry), nutmeg and a hint of clove (in the roast nuts) is inspired by the French Quatre Epices (four spices) mixture but I have substituted the white pepper with crushed red peppercorns for a festive look. And I have added an optional pinch of crushed buckthorn seeds (hippophae) for a zingy lift. I have also shared my recipe for roasted spiced walnuts which I learned from Anna Hansen’s, The Modern Pantry cook book. In the past year I have used this method to roast nuts with any imaginable spice to suit my recipes – it is a real delight!

Ingredients (4-6 people)

  • Salt to season as required
  • ½ tsp buckthorn seeds (optional)
  • 1 tsp red peppercorns
  • Olive oil
  • 3-4 Tbsp soya sauce
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 50g fresh ginger, grated
  • 2 medium onions, finely sliced
  • 500g Brussel sprout, finely sliced

 

  •  100g walnuts
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp icing sugar
  • 1 tsp nutmeg
  • Pinch of clove
  • 1 Tbsp water

Preparation (30 minutes)

  1. In a baking tray mix the walnuts, salt, icing sugar, nutmeg, clove and water until the nuts are well coated.
  2. Place in a low to medium oven (160 centrigrade) for 20 minutes or until dried and golden.
  3. Finely slice and grate the onion, sprouts and ginger.
  4. Coat the base of a wide frying pan with enough olive oil and heat.
  5. Stir fry the onion and ginger with the paprika and a pinch of salt for 5 minutes and until translucent.
  6. Add the finely sliced sprouts and stir fry with the soya sauce for 15 minutes or until the sprouts are soft.
  7. Season with additional salt or soya sauce if required – the sprouts can definitely take it so don’t be shy.
  8. Crush the red peppercorns (and buckthorn seeds) in a pestle and mortar and sprinkle on the stir fry
  9. when the walnuts are ready sprinkle on the stir-fry.
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Celeriac salad and soup recipes – October Riverside Market Garden vegetable box

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There is one thing you cannot do with celeriac, and that is to leave it out in the air once you peeled it because it quickly discolours. But if you put it in a bowl of water with a bit of lemon juice or white wine vinegar, whole, diced, sliced, chopped, grated or cut julienne it can wait for you to prepare great dishes in the kitchen.

The wonderful celeriac, a milder variety of celery, is extremely versatile and nutritious. Once you overcome the task of peeling, washing and immersing it in acidulated water you are half way there. You can almost do everything with the root of celeriac, be it a plain mash, creamed with salted butter and any spice of your choice for your roast or fish; a layered bake in white or red tomato sauces; a heart-warming soup; an alternative roast vegetable to parsnip or; a quick and simple stir fry with celeriac diced, chopped or grated. Its aroma is subtle but has enough depth so you don’t need to over spice or flavour it.

Celeriac makes a great accompaniment to beef, lamb, duck, white or smoked fish, scallops and loves bacon and spicy sausages, such as chorizo and merguez. It goes well with sage, dill, parsley and mint; and sits beautifully with milky and creamy sauces and dressings. You go as far as trying delicious (vegan) curries with coconut milk, fenugreek and turmeric if you are a spice explorer in the kitchen. Celeriac fritters work well as the vegetable takes other flavours on well; thin celeriac chips in tempura batter is a delicious beer snack, and recently when I was reading Nopi, the brand new Ottolenghi book, I came across one of the easiest ways to cook celeriac, after washing it well, trimming it, leaving the skin on and baking it for three hours in a medium hot oven! I kid you not, the possibilities are endless.

So when you come across the celeriac root in your October Riverside Market Garden Box (which of course I strongly recommend you order with no hesitation) don’t be phased by it. Start by chopping off its bottom root, and trim its hairy and nobly bits off fearlessly whilst peeling it with a small sharp knife or peeler of your choice. Use a vegetable brush to wash the mud and grit off well before immersing in acidulated water.

The two recipes below can start you off and are both are inspired by and use seasonal in my October Riverside Market Garden vegetable box. There is a quick salad and a soup suggestion rather different than the usual celeriac recipes you could google. Enjoy!

Riverside Garden raw celeriac and apple salad with Greek yoghurt remoulade dressing

Celeriac and apple salad

Ingredients (4 portions)

  • 200g celeriac, peeled in ribbons or cut julienne (small sticks)
  • 1 red apple, sliced of cut julienne
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • 1 small bunch of mint, coarsely chopped

For the dressing

  • 200g Greek yoghurt
  • 1.5 teaspoons mustard or mustard powder
  • 1 handful of capers, coarsely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • 2-3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 big pinches of salt
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup or honey

Preparation (15-20min)

  1. Trim, peel, brush and chop the celeriac.
  2. Place in acidulated water with either a squeeze of lemon or a tablespoon of white wine vinegar.
  3. Halve or quarter the apple, removing the core and chop or slice julienne.
  4. Mix the apple and celeriac and dress with the tablespoon of vinegar.
  5. To prepare the yoghurt remoulade mix the ingredients for the dressing and season to taste.
  6. Either mix the dressing on the ingredients or place on top, sprinkling it with the mint.

Lia’s tips:

  • 1 small celeriac is around 200g- don’t worry too much about accuracy measurement, you can use more or less than that in your salad.
  • Gherkins are a fine replacement for capers.
  • If you have ready-made piccalilli you can use that to flavour your yogurt dressing.
  • This salad is delicious with toasted walnuts, smoked salmon or haddock, and roast lamb.

Riverside Garden Celeriac and Beetroot soup

Celeriac and Beetroot soup

Ingredients (4 portions)

  • 200g celeriac, chopped
  • 200g mixed beetroot, chopped
  • 200g potato, chopped
  • 100g red split lentils (optional)
  • 1 leek
  • 3 spring onions or half a dry onion
  • 2 bay leaves (preferable but optional if you don’t have)
  • A small bouquet of fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 litre vegetable stock
  • Olive oil
  • Salt to season

Optional garnish

  • Handful of finely chopped capers
  • Apple slices
  • Toasted cumin and caraway seeds

Preparation (45 minutes)

  1. Peel and chop all the vegetable, and follow the celeriac preparation tips as in previous recipe.
  2. Sauté the leek, onion and bay leaves (if you are using) in a bit of olive oil (2-3 tablespoons) with a pinch of salt until translucent.
  3. Add the chopped vegetable and lentils (if you are using).
  4. Stir fry for 5 minutes and coat well in the oil.
  5. Add the stock and thyme, and simmer for at least 30 minutes.
  6. Remove the bay leaves and thyme stacks (if you are using fresh thyme bouquet).
  7. Season to taste if needed.
  8. Cream with a hand blender if you prefer a creamy soup.
  9. Serve with a pinch of chopped capers, some sliced apple and a sprinkle of toasted cumin & caraway seeds.

Lia’s tips:

  • Don’t worry about exact weighting of vegetable. You roughly require 1/3 of each vegetable in equal amounts.
  • I strongly recommend using of bay leaves but if you don’t have them thyme or other herbs will do fine.
  • Blending the soup results in a nice consistent colour but you don’t have to.
  • Use more cumin than caraway seeds. Caraway complements beetroot beautifully but can be overpowering. Sprinkle with caution.
  • Pear is also delicious with this soup if you don’t fancy apple. It’s all in season anyway!